PRESS NOTE

WORKSHOP ON HAIR TRANSPLANTATION HELD AT GMC

A National hands-on workshop on Hair Transplantation was conducted by the Department of Plastic Surgery and the Association of Hair Restoration Surgeons India (AHRS- India) in the auditorium of the Department of Forensic Medicine at Goa Medical College Dr. Pradeep Naik, Dean of Goa Medical College was the chief guest at a brief inaugural ceremony held of Goa Medical College along with the Guest of Honour, Dr. Edmundo Rodrigues, Professor of Dept. of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology. The organising secretary, Dr. Sandeep Sattur presided over the function. The President of AHRS-India, Dr. Kapil Dua, Secretary - Dr. Anil Garg, Medical Superintendent - Dr. Sunanda Amonkar, Professor in Plastic Surgery - Dr Yuri Dias-Amborcar, Assistant Professor, Forensic Medicine and Toxicology - Dr. Madhusudan Ghodkirekar were also present on dais. Speaking on occasion, Dr. Naik spoke of the   importance of these sessions for updating the knowledge of the doctors.  A book on Hair transplant by an Indian author, Dr. Venkataram Mysore was released at the hands of Chief Guest where the Newsletter of AHRS-India was released by Dr. Sunanda Amonkar, Medical Superintendent of Goa Medical College.  
 This workshop included a video session on 15th July in which national experts in the field discussed various aspects of hair restoration. The faculty comprised Senior Plastic Surgeons, dermatologist and hair specialists from across the country and over 20 delegates. On 16th July, the delegates had a hands-on training on various surgical techniques of hair restoration.  The activity concluded with a valedictory function and felicitation of the workshop coordinators and faculty.

 
 Right Dr. E.J. Rodrigues, Dr. Pradeep Naik,  Dr. Madhu Ghodkirekar, Dr. Kapil Dua, Dr. Anil Garg and Dr. Yuri Dias-Amborcar
 
 
 Book release by The- Dean.
 
Release of newsletter by MS.
 
 
 
Felicitation of Prof. Forensic Medicine.
 
Felicitaition-of-Dr.-Madhu.
 
Case-presentation
 
Case-discussion
 
 
 
Hands-on-FUE
 
Hands-on-FUT
 
Session-in-progress
 
Group-photo
 
 
 
 
 

 

Ms. Prerana Mhatre, Project manager & Training Coordinator- Goa,Spoken Tutorial Project IIT Mumbai sent proposal to Dr.Pradeep G. Naik, Dean Goa Medical College to conduct Spoken Tutorial Project for the faculty and students for all the Colleges under Dean Faculty of Medicine of Goa University as National Mission on Education through Information and Communication Technology providing “Learn Free and Open Source Software” for Free Spoken Tutorial on   LaTeX.

 

Dr.Pradeep G. Naik, convened a meeting on 20th February at 10.00 am in the conference room of Goa Medical College which was attended by the Dean and Coordinators of the following Colleges of Goa University as under:

 

GOA MEDICAL COLLEGE, BAMBOLIM - GOA

1

Dr. Pradeep G. Naik,

Goa Medical College , Bambolim – Goa

2

Dr.Prashant E Natekar

Vice Chairman and Coordinator, Medical Education Cell

3

Dr. Jagdish Kakodkar

Incharge Academic Section

 

 

 

GOA DENTAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL, BAMBOLIM – GOA.

1

Dr. Anita Spidigam

Dean, Goa Dental College & Hospital

2

Dr. James Samuel

Academic Incharge

 

 

 

SHRI KAMAXIDEVI HOMEOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE SHIRODA

1

Dr. S.D.Naik

Principal

2

Dr.Saviona Fernandes

Assistant Professor Department of Pathology

 

 

 

GOMANTAK AYURVEDIC MAHAVIDYALAYA & RESEARCH CENTRE SHIRODA

1

Dr.Neelesh Korde

 

 

 

 

P.E.S’s RAJARAM & TARABAI BANDEKAR PHARMACY COLLEGE,FARMAGUDI

1

Ms. Celina Nazareth

Principal

2

Mr. Gautam Gavde

Assistant Professor

 

 

 

GOA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

1

Dr. Sanjay Pai

Professor & Head, Pharmacy Chemistry and Pharmacy analaysis.

2

Dr.Raghuvir R.S. Pissurlenkar

 Associate Professor

 

 

 

INSTITUTE OF NURSING EDUCATION, BAMBOLIM

1

Carol Noronha

Principal

2

Ana D’souza Rauto

Associate Professor

3

Flossy Menezes

Lecturer

 

 

 

 

 

VRUNDAVAN INSTITUTE OF NURSING COLVALE

1

B.G.Bhavani

Principal

2

Shobha B. Gondiyavar

 Lecturer

         

 

 

 

 Ms. Shilpa Naik, Dhempe College of Arts and Science gave presentation on Spoken Tutorial Section for the Principals and coordinator to create awareness on computer Sciences Programmes on:

 

1.   Libre Office draw

 

2.   Linux

 

3.   G Chem Paint

 

4.   Sci Lab Phython

 

5.   Advanced Java

 

All the coordinator of the above institution registered online and a separate session for the co-coordinator is scheduled at Dhempe College on 27th February 2016.

 

Dr. Prashant E Natekar, Vice Chairperson and Coordinator, Professor and Head, Department of Anatomy has been registered as a Coordinator of Goa Medical College, wherein Faculties,Post Graduate students and Under Graduate MBBS will be registered for the Spoken Tutorial Project free of cost.The online session for the Faculty, Post Graduates and Residents will be held in the Library of the Goa Medical College.

 

A Certificate on completion of the Spoken Tutorial Project will be awarded by IIT Mumbai.

 

 

 

A report presented in The Lancet explains how a male physician who developed Ebola in Sierra Leone survived the disease soon after being treated with a drug that is being examined for use against vascular leakage syndrome.

The 38-year-old doctor was handling an Ebola therapy unit in Sierra Leone when he developed diarrhea and fever on September 28th of 2014. The same day, it was verified he had developed Ebola. He traveled to Frankfurt University Medical center in Germany 5 days later, where he was kept in a specialised isolation  unit and treated with an investigational drug known asFX06 – a fibrin extracted peptide that has been revealed to be efficient in decreasing vascular leakage in mice with Dengue hemorrhagic shock. The individual revealed symptoms of vascular leakage and failure of the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, and kidneys among other body parts; within three days of being admitted to the medical center.

After putting the individual on kidney dialysis and a ventilator, doctors gave him antibiotics and a 3-day therapy course  with FX06 in order to protect against additional vascular leakage.

In the beginning, the individual obtained 400 mg of FX06 intravenously – 200 mg were given via a slow bolus injection and after 10 mins, one more 200-mg dose was provided. The sufferer then obtained 200 mg of FX06 via an intravenous bolus  injection every 12 hours thereafter for 3 days.

They noticed a considerable improvement in the sufferer’s respiratory and vascular functionality. This coincided with a decreased viral load in his blood. Following 30 days, no Ebola virus could be found. The physician has now made a full  recovery.

In view of the emergency for action in light of the present outbreak, where validated treatments are desperately required, the effectiveness of FX06 should soon be evaluated in clinical studies or at least by standardized collection of data from sufferers with Ebola virus disease who obtained it in a compassionate use setting.

 

Reference

Severe Ebola virus disease with vascular leakage and multiorgan failure: treatment of a patient in intensive care. Published online December 19, 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(14)62384-9 http://www.thelancet.com/

 

May 27, 2015

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal discomfort or pain that is accompanied by at least two of the following: relief by a bowel movement, change in frequency of stool, or change in consistency in stool. 

The following drugs have been approved recently:

XIFAXAN (RIFAXIMIN)

Rifaximin is a semisynthetic antibiotic based on rifamycin.

The FDA approval of Xifaxan 550 mg is based on data from three phase 3 studies, TARGET 1, TARGET 2 and TARGET 3. Xifaxan 550 mg was studied in over 3,000 patients and demonstrated the efficacy and safety of repeat treatment following completion of a two-week course of treatment. A full course of Xifaxan 550 mg for IBS-D is available in a convenient 2 week pack of 42 pills.Recommended dosing for Xifaxan 550 mg for IBS-D is one 550 mg tablet three times a day for 14 days. 

Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) has been reported with use of Xifaxan, and may range in severity from mild diarrhea to fatal colitis. If CDAD is suspected or confirmed, ongoing antibiotic use not directed against C. difficile may need to be discontinued. Use with caution in patients with severe (Child-Pugh Class C) hepatic impairment.

The most common adverse reactions for Xifaxan are peripheral edema, nausea, elevated liver enzymes (ALT), dizziness, fatigue, and ascites.

VIBERZI (ELUXADOLINE)

Viberzi (eluxadoline) has mixed opioid receptor activity, it is a mu receptor agonist, a delta receptor antagonist, and a kappa receptor agonist.

Efficacy was established in two Phase III clinical studies, demonstrating significant superiority over placebo on the composite endpoint of simultaneous improvement in both abdominal pain and diarrhea at both 75 mg and 100 mg twice daily doses. 

The most common adverse events in the two Phase III clinical trials were constipation (7% and 8% for eluxadoline 75 mg and 100 mg; 2% for placebo) and nausea (8% and 7% for eluxadoline 75 mg and 100 mg; 5% for placebo). Rates of severe constipation were less than 1% in patients receiving 75 mg and 100 mg eluxadoline. Rates of discontinuation due to constipation were low for both eluxadoline and placebo (=2%) and similar rates of constipation occurred between the active and placebo arms beyond 3 months of treatment.

 

Source: www.fda.gov

 

May 2015

Digoxin has been used in clinical practice for many decades to treat patients with atrial fibrillation. However, clinical trial data about the use of digoxin for atrial fibrillation has been very limited, and its safety and effectiveness in these patients remains controversial.

Researchers analyzed 19 previously published studies that looked at the connection between digoxin use and death from atrial fibrillation and heart failure. The studies were published between 1993 and 2014, and included more than 325,000 patients.

In this review of published studies on the subject, patients treated with digoxin had a 21 percent increased risk of early death overall from any cause, compared with patients not taking the drug. Among patients with atrial fibrillation, researchers found a 29 percent greater risk of premature death, while the increased risk was 14 percent among heart failure patients. These findings are hypothesis-generating rather than definitive, as combining multiple studies together does not reduce the potential of being misleading.

Detrimental digoxin effects, particularly in AF, include digoxin-mediated increase in vagal tone, reduced AV-node conduction, and shortening of atrial refractory periods; all of these effects may render the atrium more susceptible to AF. Digoxin has been found to be associated with doubling of relapses of AF following cardioversion.Finally, digoxin may provoke paroxysmal atrial tachycardias, ventricular tachyarrhythmias including fascicular or bi-directional ventricular tachycardia or torsade de pointes tachycardia, and serious bradyarrhythmias including high-degree AV block, particularly when electrolyte disorders are present. These proarrhythmic effects of glycosides may be caused or further accentuated by significant drug–drug interactions, for instance with antiarrhythmic drugs such as amiodarone or quinidine.

Beta blockers and calcium channel blockers are considered better nowadays. If digoxin is used, careful monitoring of patients for digoxin blood levels is mandatory.

Reference

Vamos M, Erath JW, Hohnloser SH. Digoxin-associated mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature. Eur Heart J. 2015 May 4.